OBSERVER'S CORNER By Professor Hal Jandorf

The BEST astronomy is EXPERIENCING astronomy

   

Supernova in M61 (SN2020jfo), and NGC 3643 (SN 2020hvf)

This month's observers corner is presented by Dennis Willett, A.K.A. VCAS Equipment Chairperson.

The supernova in NGC 3643 (SN 2020hvf) is brighter (13.1m) than the one in M61, even though it is almost two times farther away (95 vs 52 million light years)

Earlier in May 2020hvf reached an apparent 12.4 magnitude, That is brighter than its entire host galaxy.

 

If SN 2020hvf was as close as the star Pollux is we would have a star 25,000 times as bright as the full moon but it would still appear as a point and be very difficult to look at directly.

That is only 1/30 as bright as the Sun. But the extra light would cause global warming about as much as envisioned in worst case CO2 models.

Unfortunately for us excess CO2 hangs around for a thousand years the supernova would diminish over several months.

However the gamma rays and X-rays put off during the initial detonation would probably do significant damage to the earths atmosphere. 

 

Supernovas like most natural disasters are better enjoyed from a distance. Like maybe 100+ light years.

 

Dennis.

 

The supernova in NGC 3643 (SN 2020hvf) is brighter (13.1m) than the one in M61, even though it is almost two times farther away (95 vs 52 million light years). Earlier in May 2020hvf reached an apparent 12.4 magnitude, that is brighter than its entire host galaxy. SN 2020jfo the supernova in M61 was imaged on May 26 2020. It seems to have dimmed only very slightly from the images I took on May 22.

© 2020 by Ventura County Astronomical Society. EIN: 95-3152618